Bioethics essay, Principles of Bioethics Relations

Bioethics essay, Principles of Bioethics Relations

>>> CLICK HERE <<<

Bioethics essay

Bioethics Undergraduate Essay Contest

The Center for Bioethics at NYU is pleased to announce its fourth annual undergraduate essay contest. Undergraduates from across the world are invited to submit a 2,000-3,000 word essay addressing a contemporary issue in bioethics. The winning essay(s) will be eligible for publication in the Spring 2022 issue of Medical Dialogue Review and win a cash prize! Essays will be judged by the faculty at the Center for Bioethics.

Required Criteria

  • Author(s) must currently be an undergraduate student in any country
  • Please submit essays in Word or PDF format, double spaced, and in 12 point font
  • Submissions should be prepared for blind review and include a cover sheet with your name, institution, and email address

Cash Prizes

  • 1st Place: $500
  • 2nd Place: $250

The deadline to submit is Tuesday, March 15 at 11:59PM EST.Submissions and inquires should be sent to nyucenterforbioethics@gmail.com

Principles of Bioethics Relations

The “Practical Decision Making in Health Care Ethics” has been at the focal point of research across the many fields of studies, precisely in the disciplines of Religion and Theology, Bioethics, Medicine, and Nursing. Raymond Devettere, one of the most renowned researchers and authors in this field, contends that for about fifteen years, “practical decision making in healthcare ethics has offered scholars and students a highly accessible and teachable alternative to the dominant principle-based theories in the field” (Devettere,3-4). Borrowing significantly from the positions held by Aristotle, a classical philosophical thinker, Devettere discusses elaborately the principles of Bioethics in a rather more practical oriented paradigm, to better supplement the understanding of students and scholars, and to reduce the ethical and legal dilemmas in practical decision-making scenarios in “health care ethics” (Devettere, 4 -11).

The thesis statement

This paper attempts to discuss the interrelationships that exist between four basic principles of bioethics (Beneficence, Non-maleficence, Autonomy, and Justice). Does it seek to find out to what extent does the principle of beneficence relates to that of Non-maleficence? How does the principle of autonomy affect that of beneficence and non-maleficence, and how is it affected in return. If the four principles are to be ranked by their importance, and in a given hierarchical pattern, which one comes first, and why? Is there a possibility of ranking the principles at all? This paper delves into this matter by first considering what exactly does each of these four principles implies as discussed by Raymond Devettere.

The Principle of Beneficence

The principle of Beneficence holds that a health care practitioner is obliged to act not by his or her interests, buying an essay online but in the best interest of the patient. This principle calls for balancing the benefits of receiving treatments against the cost of treatment and the risks possibly involved (Devettere, 9-18).

The Principle of Non-maleficence

Non-maleficence states, there should be no harm to the patient. The non-maleficence principle implies that any action that may harm a patient in any way must be avoided by all means. And because “many treatments involve some degree of harm, this principle also states that the harm should not be disproportionate to the benefit of the treatment” (Devettere, 9 -19).

The Principle of Autonomy

A patient’s autonomy suggests that every patient has a right to reject or accept treatment. This principle requires that a health caregiver respects the views and opinions of the patients concerning certain treatments (Devettere, 9 -19).

The Principle of Justice

According to Aristotle, justice is to give where due. It involves the distribution of scarce health resources by making conscious decisions on who gets what kind of treatment, how, and when. This principle comes in when the patient is not capable of making an informed decision about his or her treatment. The principle allows that surrogates be found to act in the capacity of the patient, in which case, justice has to apply in getting the right person (Devettere, 11 -23).

The Interrelationship

The principle of Autonomy seems to conflict with that of Beneficence. This comes in when a patient refuses or disagrees with the suggestions of the healthcare provider who in the same vein is indebted to act in the best interest of the patient. Autonomy implies that the patient has the right to refuse treatment, while beneficence requires that the healthcare service provider obeys such a decision made by the patient (Devettere, 13 -27).

What if treatment is the only way to help the patient, will the physician ignore the patient’s decision of refusing treatment? This may be an ethical dilemma that can shift situations to society, to help the patient. The society here may include guardians to the patient who may be called upon to make decisions on his/her behalf, as surrogates. But even at this juncture, it may not be apparent to the physician, choosing on whom to act on behalf of the health-disabled individual. The principle of Justice is thus upheld, to “give where it is due” (Devettere, 13 -27).

The principle of autonomy and that of beneficence may also overlap with that of non-maleficence. For instance, ignorance of the patient’s autonomy could result in reduced societal confidence in medical services. This may consequently lead to the inability of the practitioners to consider the value of beneficence.

Discussion

It may not be apparent which of the four bioethics principles mentioned here be given priority. This remains a matter of debate and opinion. However, in my capacity, I would first consider the principle of Non-maleficence, which states that there should be no harm to the patient, or at least only at a minimum degree that is not disproportional to the benefits of the treatment. Getting well through better treatment is often the priority for anyone seeking treatments? This makes this principle weigh more compared to the other three.

The second in rank of importance seems to be that of beneficence which holds that a health caregiver should act in the best interest of the patient by balancing between the risks and the benefits involved in a given treatment. Justice may come next at the third place then the principle of autonomy last.

When justice is considered before autonomy, this may help avoid the conflict that exists between the principle of autonomy and either that of beneficence or non- Non-maleficence. In this way, the many ethical dilemmas that surround the four principles can significantly be reshaped up.

Conclusion

Generally, there have been several ethical and legal dilemmas that have remained unresolved. It hasn’t been made clear as to whether a physician should act in his or her ethical and legal capacity to save the life of a patient, or the patient has more rights than a doctor concerning his or her life. Who makes decisions on behalf of an incapacitated patient has to be a legal issue characterized by a myriad of challenges, involving long and tedious legal frameworks. The above-suggested hierarchy could help if vigilantly considered.

Works Cited

Devettere, Raymond. Practical Decision Making in Health Care Ethics: Cases and Concepts. 3rd ed. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2009. 3-27

Bioethics Undergraduate Essay Contest

The Center for Bioethics at NYU is pleased to announce its fourth annual undergraduate essay contest. Undergraduates from across the world are invited to submit a 2,000-3,000 word essay addressing a contemporary issue in bioethics. The winning essay(s) will be eligible for publication in the Spring 2022 issue of Medical Dialogue Review and win a cash prize! Essays will be judged by the faculty at the Center for Bioethics.

Required Criteria

  • Author(s) must currently be an undergraduate student in any country
  • Please submit essays in Word or PDF format, double spaced, and in 12 point font
  • Submissions should be prepared for blind review and include a cover sheet with your name, institution, and email address

Cash Prizes

  • 1st Place: $500
  • 2nd Place: $250

The deadline to submit is Tuesday, March 15 at 11:59PM EST.Submissions and inquires should be sent to nyucenterforbioethics@gmail.com

Essays on Bioethics

Bioethics is the work of the typical controversial ethical issues emerging from new places and possibilities brought about by advances in biology and medical specialty. Publications in biotechnology have the potential to challenge deeply held feelings and traditions surrounding ethics, church property and culture. The.

A Review on The End-of-life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: a Bioethical Perspective

D. Micah Hester’s book End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective is a reviving examination of good issues encompassing look after the withering utilizing what he calls a profoundly experimental logic vigorously obliged to William James. For Hester, radical observation acknowledges as genuine.

Bioethics Scholars Moral and Legal Opinion on Physician-assisted Suicide (pas)

Abstract This review covers the current legal and ethical perspectives of scholars in the field of bioethics concerning physician-assisted suicide (PAS). It covers the development of new arguments for or against PAS that have been posited by various authors. These arguments vary in their interpretation.

Bioethics as a Motion

Bioethics is a motion. A motion from “doing what we think is right” to “doing what is right”. It is a reflective examination of the ethical issues in the field of healthcare, research, and health policy. These fields have always had the ethical standards, which.

Eugenics and Bioethics

In my opinion, there is a fundamental difference between the past eugenics and present biotechnology even though there lies certain issue of value pluralism. In this essay, I will discuss my views on how past eugenics has cast a shadow of horror in the lives.

Bioethical Issues Related to Genetic Engineering

Genetic engineering, in definition, is the artificial manipulation, modification, and recombination of DNA or other nucleic acid molecules in order to modify an organism or a population of organisms. Genetic engineering is beneficial in many ways. In an experiment setting, the technology was demonstrated to.

Bioethical Issues in My Sister’s Keeper: Having Your Autonomy Taken to Save Your Sibling

Every day nurses and doctors are faced with ethical issues that can affect the patient’s quality of life. It is important for essay buy online the health care provider to consider all the factors and what the patient wants for their plan of care. My Sister’s Keeper was.

Eugenics, Its History and Modern Development

What is Eugenics Eugenics is recognised as a science that involves controlled breeding within a population to improve the occurrence of desirable traits and decrease the inheritance of genetic diseases and undesirable traits. The origin of the term eugenics derives from the Greek word ‘eu’.

The Legal and Bioethical Aspects of Personalised Medicine Based on Genetic Composition

In case the genomic time can be said to have an exact birth date, it was within the middle of the appearance of the series, on April 14, 2003. That was when the worldwide exertion known as the Human Genome Extend put an effort to.

Bioethics and The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment

If one was ever told that a government agency deceived a group of socioeconomic, disadvantaged, sick people and put them in an experiment where they never gave consent nor were, they ever treated of their diseases when the cure was made available. ‘Evil’, ‘cruel’, ‘barbaric’.

Effects of X-rays, Water Bottle Plastics and Cell Phones in The Cause of Cancer as Illustrated in a Bioethics Study

Bioethics is the study of ethical problems arising from biological research.. Many people have commented on such subject of how X-rays, plastic from water bottles, and cell phones can cause cancers. This is a very recent project that scientists are working on at the moment.

Please verify you are a human

Access to this page has been denied because we believe you are using automation tools to browse the website.

This may happen as a result of the following:

  • Javascript is disabled or blocked by an extension (ad blockers for example)
  • Your browser does not support cookies

Please make sure that Javascript and cookies are enabled on your browser and that you are not blocking them from loading.

Bioethics essay, Bioethics essay

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

@2022 Fintech Technologies Limited. All Rights Reserved

baccarat casino